The Latest

Here’s the third of four interior design/ shopping guides we’ve created with overstock. Get this look for less! Here’s how.
Oct 13, 2014 / 305 notes

Here’s the third of four interior design/ shopping guides we’ve created with overstock. Get this look for less! Here’s how.

NEW: Making a #kitchen cabinet upgrade? Download our free top-to-bottom “Guide to Stock Kitchen Cabinets” (courtesy Cabinets To Go) STAT! Get yours here.
Oct 10, 2014 / 20 notes

NEW: Making a #kitchen cabinet upgrade? Download our free top-to-bottom “Guide to Stock Kitchen Cabinets” (courtesy Cabinets To Go) STAT! Get yours here.

Oct 8, 2014 / 35 notes

Click through for the beautiful images, stay for the ghost tales.

Top 15 Haunted Lighthouses from our sister site Coastal Living

apartmenttherapy:

Troubling Household Sounds Only You Can Recognize: http://on.apttherapy.com/4VQdW9
Oct 8, 2014 / 29 notes

apartmenttherapy:

Troubling Household Sounds Only You Can Recognize: http://on.apttherapy.com/4VQdW9

thisoldapt:

OMEGA thrilled to see this (via overstock) hit the thisoldhouse homepage today!-ts

Utilitarian furnishings, metal accents, and warm, aged wood patinas are the hallmarks of Industrial Chic. Here’s how to achieve (and shop) the look for your own home.
Oct 7, 2014 / 168 notes

thisoldapt:

OMEGA thrilled to see this (via overstock) hit the thisoldhouse homepage today!-ts

Utilitarian furnishings, metal accents, and warm, aged wood patinas are the hallmarks of Industrial Chic. Here’s how to achieve (and shop) the look for your own home.

thisoldapt:

From book storage to wall art. Just like that.
Oct 6, 2014 / 1,096 notes

thisoldapt:

From book storage to wall art. Just like that.

Shrubs give this garden its lush, carefree beauty. Here, a flowering ‘Limelight’ hydrangea mingles with the cream-rimmed foliage of an Ivory Halo dogwood.
Oct 6, 2014 / 18 notes

Shrubs give this garden its lush, carefree beauty. Here, a flowering ‘Limelight’ hydrangea mingles with the cream-rimmed foliage of an Ivory Halo dogwood.

Screen racks to dry flower heads, including rosebuds, lavender, violas, red salvia, and pinks.
Take a peek inside this ultimate bonus room (that’s a shed)
Oct 6, 2014 / 99 notes

Screen racks to dry flower heads, including rosebuds, lavender, violas, red salvia, and pinks.

Take a peek inside this ultimate bonus room (that’s a shed)

thisoldapt:

Use affordable chicken wire to create this ultra-creepy Halloween “apparition.” Here’s how via thisoldhouse:

Step 1:Form the head: Center the wire piece over your wig form, bowl, or vase. Using your hands, press and pinch the wire into a convex shape for the top of the head. As you work your way down, cinch the hexes more tightly and permanently together where needed, using needle-nose pliers to crimp the wire. Keep going until you’ve got a bell-shaped form that extends to just below the nose.Step 2:Form the chin, neck, and face: Start by pinching the hexes to form the pointy part of the chin. Use the wire snips as needed to clip the wire in a curve roughly following the jawline, so that you can fold and overlap the wire underneath to define the chin and neck. For the back of the head and the nape of the neck, clip the wire vertically and overlap the pieces slightly to form a seam to contour and narrow this area. Continue shaping the wire with your fingers to form the nose, lips, chin, and neck. You’ll now have a head and neck “emerging” from a somewhat flat base of chicken wire.Step 3:Make the shoulders: With the head facing you, snip the wire on each side, where the shoulders will go, to about 6 inches from the head. Make the snips close to the corners of the hexes, which will create longer prongs on the cut sides that can be used for attaching pieces later. Overlap the flaps to form the shoulders and the top of the torso, and secure them using the prongs of the cut wire.Step 4:Make the torso and thighs: Form the wire piece into a cylinder, overlapping the ends by about 3 inches. Attach this to the base of the shoulders; snip the wire on the edges if needed to fasten the two pieces together. Eyeball your ghost to decide where the waist should be, and shape the wire by hand to form it. Create the thighs by snipping the wire vertically in the center front and back, along the “inseam”; bend and fasten each side into thighs.Step 5:Form the arms: To create the straight left arm, form the wire piece into a cylinder, as you did with the torso, but slightly overlap the piece at an angle, so you’ll form a thicker upper arm and thinner lower arm. For the right bent arm, form a bigger cylinder with one piece and a smaller one with the other; fasten them together at a roughly 120-degree angle to form the elbow. Attach each arm to the torso; you may need to clip off a bit of wire near the armpits to do this. With your fingers, contour the wire to look more like arms, with elbows, wrists, and hands. (Bonus points if you create fingers!)Step 6:Make the lower legs: Form cylinders from the wire pieces; attach to the thighs at angles to form the knees. Angle the legs so it appears that your ghost is out for a stroll.Step 7:Make the feet: Form cylinders from the wire pieces. Flatten the cylinders slightly to make soles on the bottoms, and cinch closed one end of each to form toes. Fasten the feet to the calves.Step 8:Make the ax: Fold the wire piece in half so that it measures 12 inches by 6 inches. On the open side of the rectangle, cut out a portion of wire measuring roughly 4 inches by 8 inches, leaving the remainder as an ax-like shape. Overlap the wires along the seams to secure them and to firm up the ax’s handle and blade. Attach the handle to the right hand of your ghost, bending and contouring the hand as needed.Step 9:Put the ghost on display. To help it stand upright, you may need to attach it with rope or wire to a nearby tree, shrub, or part of your house. Or hang the ghost from a tree limb, using several loops of heavy-duty fishing line just taut enough so that its feet rest on the ground.
For shopping list and more, see here.
Oct 5, 2014 / 569 notes

thisoldapt:

Use affordable chicken wire to create this ultra-creepy Halloween “apparition.” Here’s how via thisoldhouse:

Step 1:
Form the head: Center the wire piece over your wig form, bowl, or vase. Using your hands, press and pinch the wire into a convex shape for the top of the head. As you work your way down, cinch the hexes more tightly and permanently together where needed, using needle-nose pliers to crimp the wire. Keep going until you’ve got a bell-shaped form that extends to just below the nose.

Step 2:
Form the chin, neck, and face: Start by pinching the hexes to form the pointy part of the chin. Use the wire snips as needed to clip the wire in a curve roughly following the jawline, so that you can fold and overlap the wire underneath to define the chin and neck. For the back of the head and the nape of the neck, clip the wire vertically and overlap the pieces slightly to form a seam to contour and narrow this area. Continue shaping the wire with your fingers to form the nose, lips, chin, and neck. You’ll now have a head and neck “emerging” from a somewhat flat base of chicken wire.

Step 3:
Make the shoulders: With the head facing you, snip the wire on each side, where the shoulders will go, to about 6 inches from the head. Make the snips close to the corners of the hexes, which will create longer prongs on the cut sides that can be used for attaching pieces later. Overlap the flaps to form the shoulders and the top of the torso, and secure them using the prongs of the cut wire.

Step 4:
Make the torso and thighs: Form the wire piece into a cylinder, overlapping the ends by about 3 inches. Attach this to the base of the shoulders; snip the wire on the edges if needed to fasten the two pieces together. Eyeball your ghost to decide where the waist should be, and shape the wire by hand to form it. Create the thighs by snipping the wire vertically in the center front and back, along the “inseam”; bend and fasten each side into thighs.

Step 5:
Form the arms: To create the straight left arm, form the wire piece into a cylinder, as you did with the torso, but slightly overlap the piece at an angle, so you’ll form a thicker upper arm and thinner lower arm. For the right bent arm, form a bigger cylinder with one piece and a smaller one with the other; fasten them together at a roughly 120-degree angle to form the elbow. Attach each arm to the torso; you may need to clip off a bit of wire near the armpits to do this. With your fingers, contour the wire to look more like arms, with elbows, wrists, and hands. (Bonus points if you create fingers!)

Step 6:
Make the lower legs: Form cylinders from the wire pieces; attach to the thighs at angles to form the knees. Angle the legs so it appears that your ghost is out for a stroll.

Step 7:
Make the feet: Form cylinders from the wire pieces. Flatten the cylinders slightly to make soles on the bottoms, and cinch closed one end of each to form toes. Fasten the feet to the calves.

Step 8:
Make the ax: Fold the wire piece in half so that it measures 12 inches by 6 inches. On the open side of the rectangle, cut out a portion of wire measuring roughly 4 inches by 8 inches, leaving the remainder as an ax-like shape. Overlap the wires along the seams to secure them and to firm up the ax’s handle and blade. Attach the handle to the right hand of your ghost, bending and contouring the hand as needed.

Step 9:
Put the ghost on display. To help it stand upright, you may need to attach it with rope or wire to a nearby tree, shrub, or part of your house. Or hang the ghost from a tree limb, using several loops of heavy-duty fishing line just taut enough so that its feet rest on the ground.

For shopping list and more, see here.

Get major bang for your buck by using high-impact finishes sparingly. Here, multihued ceramic tiles cover just a portion of one wall between upper and lower cabinets, but their cheery palette packs a monster visual punch.
Oct 5, 2014 / 89 notes

Get major bang for your buck by using high-impact finishes sparingly. Here, multihued ceramic tiles cover just a portion of one wall between upper and lower cabinets, but their cheery palette packs a monster visual punch.

The master bath, one of two new ones upstairs, has a vintage look, with beadboard, subway tile, a black-and-white mosaic floor, and a newly vaulted ceiling.
Oct 5, 2014 / 50 notes

The master bath, one of two new ones upstairs, has a vintage look, with beadboard, subway tile, a black-and-white mosaic floor, and a newly vaulted ceiling.

A herringbone pattern accentuates subway tile, turning a simple white-tile backsplash into a handsome focal point.
Oct 5, 2014 / 78 notes

A herringbone pattern accentuates subway tile, turning a simple white-tile backsplash into a handsome focal point.

When this architectural style reigned, from 1880 to 1910, Queen Anne herself was long dead. But her influence was not. It had lived on in enormous, ostentatious English manor houses for nearly 200 years.
Read more about Queen Anne style
Oct 4, 2014 / 24 notes

When this architectural style reigned, from 1880 to 1910, Queen Anne herself was long dead. But her influence was not. It had lived on in enormous, ostentatious English manor houses for nearly 200 years.

Read more about Queen Anne style

Open shelves help tap every cubic inch of a kitchen island, which has a beefy butcher-block top and furniture-like feet.
Oct 4, 2014 / 15 notes

Open shelves help tap every cubic inch of a kitchen island, which has a beefy butcher-block top and furniture-like feet.

Shoehorned in an 8-foot-wide-by-3½-foot-deep stair landing off a basement-level back door, this space-challenged mudroom cleverly corrals coats in an unexpected place.
Oct 4, 2014 / 35 notes

Shoehorned in an 8-foot-wide-by-3½-foot-deep stair landing off a basement-level back door, this space-challenged mudroom cleverly corrals coats in an unexpected place.